Daily Bible Podcast - Audio Bible Reading Plan
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Daily Bible Podcast - Audio Bible Reading Plan

Tricia Goyer and Michelle Hill

Do you want to read the Bible every day but don't know where to start? Do you struggle to keep up with Bible reading plans -- especially once you get to books like Leviticus? We've been there! But reading the Bible in a year IS possible - and we're here to help! 

We're Tricia Goyer and Michelle Hill, two friends inviting you to join us in reading through the Bible chronologically this year. Reading the Bible every day can be a challenge, even with a great daily bible reading plan. We're here to sum up each day's passage and provide action steps ... all in under 15 minutes. You don't need to start in the New Year - you can jump in today!

Grab a buddy and join our community. Take the plunge, and let’s read through the Bible together. We'll be cheering you on all the way!

⭐️ All the info you need to START this Daily Bible Podcast Plan + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!

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Day 32 - Finding Faith in the Midst of Hardship (Exodus 1 - 4, 1 Chronicles 6) - Year 2
February 1, 2024 - 24 min
All the info you need to START + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Exodus 1, Exodus 2, 1 Chronicles 6:1-3, Exodus 3, Exodus 4:1-17 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Protest Today, as we delve into the books of Exodus and 1 Chronicles, we find ourselves transported back to a pivotal moment in biblical history, about 300 years after Joseph. The Israelites, once favored in Egypt, are now subjected to slavery and harsh decrees under a Pharaoh who has forgotten Joseph's contributions. This period is marked by harsh trials, yet it is also a time of immense faith and resilience. The Courage of Moses' Family In Hebrews 11:23, we read about the extraordinary faith of Moses' parents. They defied Pharaoh's edict to kill all Hebrew male infants, hiding Moses for three months. Their act of faith and disobedience sets a powerful precedent. Similarly, Shiphrah and Puah, two midwives, bravely allowed Hebrew boys to live, going against Pharaoh’s orders. These acts of defiance highlight the strength of conviction over fear. Moses: A Life of Struggle and Identity Born a Hebrew, raised in Pharaoh's palace, and later fleeing to Midian, Moses lived as a foreigner in many worlds. His son’s name, Gershom, means "a foreigner there." It symbolizes Moses’ perpetual state of not belonging.  The Burning Bush: A Call to Action A defining moment occurs when God appears to Moses in a burning bush and tasks him with leading the Israelites out of Egypt. Moses' response is not of immediate acceptance but of protest. He questions his abilities and worthiness. This interaction reveals a profound truth: often, we are called to tasks that seem beyond our capacity, yet it is not in our strength but in God’s presence that we find the ability to act. The Power of Protest The word 'protest' takes on significant meaning in these chapters. Moses repeatedly protests his assignment, embodying the human tendency to doubt and question. Each protest is met with reassurance from God, emphasizing that it is not Moses alone who will act, but God through Moses. Divine Intervention and Remembrance In Exodus 2:23-24, we see a shift as God hears the groaning of the Israelites and remembers His covenant. The verbs used here – heard, remembered, looked, knew – signify a God deeply involved and responsive to His people's plight. This divine intervention is a reminder of God's faithfulness and active presence in our struggles. The Reluctant Leader Moses, a simple shepherd at the time of his calling, embodies the reluctant leader. His questions to God – "Who am I to appear before Pharaoh?" and "Who am I to lead the Israelites?" – are met with a simple yet profound assurance: "I will be with you." This narrative teaches us that our capabilities are not as important as the presence and guidance of God in our endeavors. Personal Reflection: Writing "From Dust and Ashes" My personal journey as an author mirrors Moses' story of doubt and divine calling. When I began writing "From Dust and Ashes," I was a young mother with limited knowledge of World War II. Yet, like Moses, I found reassurance not in my own abilities but in the calling and presence of God.  Embracing Our Callings As we reflect on these chapters, let's embrace the lessons of faith, protest, and divine calling. Let us remember that in our moments of doubt and fear, we are not alone. God's presence and promise, "I will be with you," is a constant source of strength and guidance. May we find courage in our callings, no matter how daunting they may seem. SOCIALS: Tricia: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Michelle: Instagram | LinkedIn Daily Bible Podcast: Instagram | Facebook | Join the Community  LifeAudio: The Daily Bible Podcast is brought to you by LifeAudio - a Christian podcast network dedicated to captivate, inform, and strengthen your faith! Find your new favorite podcast at LifeAudio.com  DISCLAIMER: The Daily Bible Podcast, Tricia Goyer, Michelle Hill, and affiliates are not a church, pastor, spiritual authority, or counseling service. Listeners and viewers consume this content on a voluntary basis and ass
Day 31 - Can God Restore the Pain? (Job 40 - 42) - Year 2
January 31, 2024 - 21 min
website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Job 40:6-24, Job 41 - 42 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Restore In the concluding chapters of the Book of Job, we witness a profound transformation. The dialogue between Job and God, especially in chapters 38 to 40, culminates in a powerful exchange where Job is profoundly humbled and ultimately restored. God in the Whirlwind The narrative takes a dramatic turn when God speaks to Job a second time from the whirlwind. He confronts Job with hard-hitting questions. Job 40:8 stands out. God asks, "Will you discredit my justice and condemn me just to prove you are right?" This question is a piercing wake-up call for Job. Behemoth, Leviathan, and the Majesty of God's Creation God draws Job's attention to the Behemoth and Leviathan, mysterious and powerful creatures. These descriptions stir the imagination, leading some, like myself, to believe dinosaurs coexisted with humans. The Behemoth is described as a grass-eating giant with a tail like a cedar, and the Leviathan, portrayed with fearsome power, symbolizes the vastness and diversity of God's creation. This part of the dialogue emphasizes the incredible scope of God's creative power, extending far beyond human understanding. Job's Response and Restoration Job's response to God's overwhelming revelation is one of deep humility. Acknowledging his limitations, he admits to speaking of things "far too wonderful" for him. Job's journey from questioning to understanding is encapsulated in Job 42:5, "I had only heard about you before, but now I have seen you with my own eyes."  A Tale of Restoration and Hope This story reminds me of Kristen Jane Anderson, whose remarkable journey from despair to hope I wrote about in "Life, In Spite of Me." Like Job, Kristen faced unimaginable suffering but found restoration and a new purpose in life. Her story, like Job's, is a testament to the fact that even in our darkest moments, God is working toward restoration. The Theme of Restoration The Book of Job closes with a powerful note of restoration. God not only restores Job's fortunes but also blesses him more abundantly than before. This restoration is not just material but also spiritual and emotional. It's a vivid illustration of God's capacity to bring beauty from ashes, to transform sorrow into joy. The Legacy of Memories As Job's story concludes, we're reminded that while restoration is beautiful, it doesn't erase the past. Job likely remembered his lost children, just as my friend remembers her little boy, Eddie. These memories, both joyful and painful, shape us and expand our understanding of God. They remind us that our journey with God is not just about the restoration of what was lost but also about growing in our relationship with Him. In conclusion, the Book of Job is more than just a story of suffering and questioning; it's a narrative about understanding, humility, and restoration. It teaches us that in our limited understanding, we can trust in God's infinite wisdom and His power to restore and transform our lives. SOCIALS: Tricia: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Michelle: Instagram | LinkedIn Daily Bible Podcast: Instagram | Facebook | Join the Community  LifeAudio: The Daily Bible Podcast is brought to you by LifeAudio - a Christian podcast network dedicated to captivate, inform, and strengthen your faith! Find your new favorite podcast at LifeAudio.com  DISCLAIMER: The Daily Bible Podcast, Tricia Goyer, Michelle Hill, and affiliates are not a church, pastor, spiritual authority, or counseling service. Listeners and viewers consume this content on a voluntary basis and assume all responsibility for the resulting consequences and impact. Discover more Christian podcasts at lifeaudio.com and inquire about advertising opportunities at lifeaudio.com/contact-us.
Day 30 - God's Sarcasm and Power (Job 38 - 40) - Year 2
January 30, 2024 - 21 min
All the info you need to START + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Job 38-39, Job 40:1-5 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Creation In the book of Job, a pattern emerges where Job responds to his friends and then turns to God with questions and insights. This changes dramatically in chapters 38 to 40. After Elihu's speeches, God Himself speaks to Job from a whirlwind.  God's Sarcasm and Power: A Reality Check for Job In Job 38:1, God confronts Job, asking, "Who is this that questions my wisdom with such ignorant words?" God's response is not just a rebuttal but a comprehensive exposition of His creation and power. It's a stark reminder of the contrast between the finite understanding of humans and the infinite wisdom of God. The sarcastic remark in verse 21, "For you were born before it was all created, and you are so very experienced!" is particularly striking, highlighting Job's limited perspective compared to God's eternal presence. God's Mastery Over Creation God's dialogue encompasses the vastness of His creation, from the earth's systems to the stars, and even the instincts and intuition of creatures. The example of the ostrich in Job 39, lacking in wisdom yet part of God's design, serves as a metaphor for the unexpected ways of the Creator. This dialogue underscores the message that questioning God's wisdom is futile, as His knowledge and control extend far beyond human comprehension. Job's Humbling Response In Job 40, God challenges Job directly, asking if he wishes to continue arguing. Job's reply is one of humility and recognition of his limitations: "I am nothing–how could I ever find the answers? I will cover my mouth with my hand. I have said too much already. I have nothing more to say." This is a moment of profound realization and surrender for Job. Personal Reflections: Marveling at God's Creation As I (Tricia) reflect on these chapters, I am reminded of my own experience in Kenya, where the beauty and brutality of nature were on full display. Witnessing the animals in the Masai Mara, their instincts, and survival mechanisms left me in awe of God's creation. It's a stark reminder that often, our disconnect from nature blinds us to the wonders of God's work. Experiencing the natural world can deepen our appreciation for the Creator's power and design. The Power of Words and God's Language Words are a significant part of our lives, and as we see in these chapters, God's use of language is nothing short of masterful. His words are not just communicative but also creative, bringing into existence the complexities of the universe. This reminds us of the immense power and beauty inherent in language, a gift that we often take for granted. Concluding Thoughts: Embracing God's Wisdom As we delve into these chapters of Job, we are reminded of God's immense power and wisdom. In the grand scheme of His creation, our understanding is limited, yet our capacity to marvel at His works is boundless. This journey through Job encourages us to embrace humility, acknowledge our limitations, and trust in the divine wisdom that orchestrates the universe. SOCIALS: Tricia: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Michelle: Instagram | LinkedIn Daily Bible Podcast: Instagram | Facebook | Join the Community  LifeAudio: The Daily Bible Podcast is brought to you by LifeAudio - a Christian podcast network dedicated to captivate, inform, and strengthen your faith! Find your new favorite podcast at LifeAudio.com  DISCLAIMER: The Daily Bible Podcast, Tricia Goyer, Michelle Hill, and affiliates are not a church, pastor, spiritual authority, or counseling service. Listeners and viewers consume this content on a voluntary basis and assume all responsibility for the resulting consequences and impact. Discover more Christian podcasts at lifeaudio.com and inquire about advertising opportunities at lifeaudio.com/contact-us.
Day 29 - Should We Question God? (Job 35 - 37) - Year 2
January 29, 2024 - 21 min
All the info you need to START + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Job 35-37 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Messy In Job 35, we encounter Elihu delivering a rather stark reminder to Job about God's justice. The New Living Translation vividly illustrates this by stating, "But you are talking nonsense, Job. You have spoken like a fool." This scene is striking, similar to a parent sternly correcting a child. Although in this case Elihu’s words are against a well-respected community leader, making Elihu's words even more biting. Job 36-37: Elihu's Defense and the Brewing Storm As we move to Job 36, Elihu's tone shifts to a self-assured defense of God. He claims unparalleled knowledge and suggests no one else's arguments hold weight. His lack of humility is palpable. In Job 37, the narrative takes a symbolic turn with a brewing storm, which is undoubtedly a metaphor for the impending divine intervention in the form of a whirlwind, as we'll see in Job 38. Elihu's Main Point: The Inviolability of God's Justice Elihu's primary point seems to be that questioning God's justice is not permissible. Despite his harshness, there is merit in this point. Believing God to be in the wrong is a step too far. Job's plea in 31:25 for God to respond to him sets the stage for the divine answer to come. The Day's Word: 'Messy' Today's word is 'messy', encompassing both the untidiness of physical spaces and the complexity of situations. Human emotions, relationships, and pain epitomize this messiness. There are seldom easy answers, yet even in this chaos, there is room for growth and trust in God despite the lack of understanding or clear answers. Applying Job's Lessons to Our Lives The Book of Job teaches us that niceties aren't always necessary or beneficial. Sometimes, a more direct or even harsh approach is needed, especially in faith or correcting misconceptions about God. This is mirrored in my personal experience with adopting teenagers who had experienced trauma. An honest, though difficult, confrontation was necessary to address their harsh words toward me (Tricia), ultimately leading to healing and understanding. Embracing the Messy, Trusting in God As we near the end of Job, we're reminded that questioning God's actions or motives may not be our place. A gentle rebuke can sometimes be necessary. Elihu's stern approach to Job might have been needed to convey this important lesson. In our lives, amidst the 'messy', turning to God rather than accusing Him can be a source of strength and perspective. A listener's experience with a blessing jar beautifully illustrates how recognizing God's blessings, even in the midst of suffering, can transform our outlook and bring healing. Final Thoughts: Anticipating God's Response Tomorrow, as we delve into Job 38, we eagerly await God's response. This journey through Job teaches us that while it's essential to confront the messy aspects of life, it's equally crucial to seek God's wisdom and perspective in navigating them. SOCIALS: Tricia: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Michelle: Instagram | LinkedIn Daily Bible Podcast: Instagram | Facebook | Join the Community  LifeAudio: The Daily Bible Podcast is brought to you by LifeAudio - a Christian podcast network dedicated to captivate, inform, and strengthen your faith! Find your new favorite podcast at LifeAudio.com  DISCLAIMER: The Daily Bible Podcast, Tricia Goyer, Michelle Hill, and affiliates are not a church, pastor, spiritual authority, or counseling service. Listeners and viewers consume this content on a voluntary basis and assume all responsibility for the resulting consequences and impact. Discover more Christian podcasts at lifeaudio.com and inquire about advertising opportunities at lifeaudio.com/contact-us.
Day 28 - The Challenge of True Listening (Job 32 - 34) - Year 2
January 28, 2024 - 20 min
All the info you need to START + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Job 32-34 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Listen In the saga of Job, chapters 32 to 34 introduce us to a new character, Elihu. His entrance marks a pivotal moment in the narrative. These chapters continue the exploration of suffering and divine justice and delve into the art of listening and understanding. Elihu: The Scribe Turned Speaker Elihu, believed by some scholars to have been a scribe, initially observes the conversations between Job and his friends silently. However, he reaches a point where he feels compelled to speak out. In Job 32:2-5, Elihu expresses his frustration with both Job for not admitting his sins and with Job’s friends for failing to provide convincing answers. Elihu's outburst, “I am like a cask of wine without a vent,” symbolizes his overwhelming urge to share his thoughts. Elihu’s Perspective on Divine Communication Elihu offers a unique take on how God communicates with humans. He suggests that God uses various methods, including discipline through pain and messages through angels or mediators. In Job 33:24, Elihu speaks of a gracious entity who can rescue from death, a concept that resonates with Messianic expectations. This idea of a Mediator who protects from death and offers redemption is profound and foreshadows later theological concepts. Elihu’s Accusations Against Job While Elihu provides some encouraging insights, such as God's willingness to accept and restore those who pray to Him (Job 33:26), he also challenges Job's attitude. In Chapter 34, Elihu accuses Job of arrogance and rebellion against God. This accusation seems harsh, especially given Job’s persistent integrity throughout his trials. Reevaluating Elihu's Role Initially, one might perceive Elihu as a wise and understanding friend, but a closer examination of his words reveals a complex character. Like Job's other friends, Elihu believes he knows God and His ways. He speaks truths about God's omnipresence and power, yet his approach to Job is not entirely devoid of judgment. The Art of Listening According to Elihu Elihu’s repeated plea, “Listen to me,” highlights the importance of active listening. His intervention reminds us of the power of truly hearing and understanding others rather than simply waiting for our turn to speak. This is a vital lesson in any discourse, especially in matters of spiritual and emotional significance. Parenting and Listening: Lessons from Elihu Good parenting advice often emphasizes the importance of listening – truly listening – to children. Stephen Covey’s quote, “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply,” is particularly relevant here. Elihu’s and Job's friends' failure to genuinely listen to Job underscores this point. They were more focused on providing answers than understanding Job's heart. The Importance of Being Other-Focused in Listening Listening is an active skill that requires focus and empathy. It involves more than just hearing words; it's about understanding the emotions and thoughts behind them. True listening is other-focused, characterized by asking questions like “tell me more about this” or seeking deeper understanding of the person’s experiences. Elihu's Prophecy and the Power of Listening Despite Elihu's shortcomings in fully grasping Job's situation, his speech does contain elements of prophecy, particularly regarding the concept of a Mediator. This suggests that even in imperfect communication, elements of truth and insight can emerge. Elihu’s ability to pause and listen to God allowed him to convey this significant prophecy. Conclusion: Embracing the Art of Listening As we reflect on Elihu's role in Job 32-34, we are reminded of the complexities of human communication and the profound impact of genuine listening. Whether in parenting, friendship, or spiritual discourse, the ability to truly hear and empathize with others is invaluable. As we navigate our conversations and relationships, let's strive to listen with the intent to understand, embracing the power of empathy and connection in our interactions. SOCIALS: Tricia: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Michelle: Instagram | LinkedIn Daily Bible Podcast: Inst
Day 27 - From Dust to Hope (Job 30 - 31) - Year 2
January 27, 2024 - 21 min
All the info you need to START + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Job 30-31 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Dust In chapters 30 and 31, we find Job in the depths of anguish, a point where his trials seem to reach their pinnacle. His experiences, encapsulated in these chapters, offer profound insights into the nature of suffering, integrity, and faith. Job's Descent into Anguish In Job 30, we witness a man who has faced immense trials and now finds himself in deep despair. "My honor has blown away in the wind, and my prosperity has vanished like a cloud" (Job 30:15), he laments. This vivid imagery of loss and disintegration captures the essence of Job's plight. He feels reduced to nothing, likening himself to dust and ashes amidst his suffering (Job 30:19). This metaphor resonates deeply, especially when we consider the historical context of the Holocaust, where many endured unimaginable suffering in concentration camps like Mauthausen, often finding themselves literally in dust and ashes.   Job's Integrity Amidst Suffering Despite his dire circumstances, Job maintains his integrity. In chapter 31, he continues to assert his innocence, adamant that he does not deserve the calamities that have befallen him. This steadfastness in the face of unjust suffering is a testament to Job's character. It's essential to remember that, as stated in Job 1, God considered Job "the finest man in all the earth," a man of complete integrity.   The Wrestling of Job's Heart As readers, we are drawn into the emotional and spiritual wrestling in Job's heart. His journey through suffering allows us to reflect on our trials. It's almost as if we're cheering for Job, encouraging him to hold on for one more day amidst his despair. This aspect of Job's story is relatable to anyone who has faced trials and struggled to maintain hope.   Echoes of Christ in Job's Suffering Job's experiences and expressions of feeling abandoned by God mirror the anguish Christ experienced. The parallels between Job's cries of being mocked and ignored by God and Jesus's agonizing prayers in the Garden of Gethsemane and on the cross are striking. These moments in Scripture highlight the depth of human despair that can be experienced even by the most righteous.   The Poetry of Job's Suffering The poetic elements in Job's story, like the alliteration and wordplay in the original Hebrew text, add layers of depth to his suffering. These literary devices underscore Job's profound loss and desolation.   The Universal Experience of Suffering Job's story is a powerful reminder that suffering is a common human experience. We all face "desolation and desolateness," as Job did. We encounter people who, like Job, are grappling with profound loss and pain. What these individuals need from us is not judgment or mockery, as Job received from his friends, but compassion, understanding, and a willingness to listen. Legacy Beyond Dust The phrase "dust in the wind," is reminiscent of both Job's plight and the biblical wisdom literature. Our responses to suffering, integrity, and compassion can leave an enduring legacy. Job's journey, marked by unparalleled suffering, also highlights the resilience of the human spirit and the capacity for hope amidst despair.   The Hope Beyond the Ashes Job's narrative offers a glimpse of the hope that lies beyond the dust and ashes. Job's unwavering integrity, despite his circumstances, challenges us to hold onto our faith and values, even when the path seems darkest. Amidst our own 'dust and ashes,' may we find the strength to offer compassion and understanding to those who suffer. Our material wealth or earthly honors do not define our legacy, but our love, truth, and faith do. Just as the veterans of Mauthausen wished for their stories of suffering and resilience to be remembered and learned from, we too can contribute to a legacy that outlasts our physical existence. SOCIALS: Tricia: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Michelle: Instagram | LinkedIn Daily Bible Podcast: Instagram | Facebook | Join the Community  LifeAudio: The Daily Bible Podca
Day 26 - Comfort in the Midst of Trials (Job 26-29) - Year 2
January 26, 2024 - 18 min
All the info you need to START + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Job 26-29 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Reflect The book of Job, a profound piece of poetry and conversation, delves into the depths of human suffering and the pursuit of understanding. In today’s reading, we explore Job's response to his friend Bildad in Job 26, his declaration of innocence in Chapters 27-28, and his reflections on the past in Chapter 29. Throughout these chapters, we witness the interplay of science, wisdom, and the desire for comfort amidst adversity.   Science in Job: Surprisingly, within the ancient text of Job, we find glimpses of scientific understanding. Job 26 reveals verses that touch upon cosmic principles, such as the suspension of the Earth in empty space and the separation of waters to create the horizon. While the Bible is not a scientific text, it hints at scientific concepts like space, gravity, and atmosphere, reflecting a world inspired by a wise Creator.   Job's Integrity: In his "final speech," Job adamantly asserts his innocence, swearing an oath by the living God in Job 27:1. He refuses to compromise his integrity to appease his friends. Despite his suffering, Job remains resolute in his belief that he has done nothing wrong.   Wisdom vs. Material Wealth: Job 28 is a fascinating exploration of human achievements in mining and the search for precious resources. It's remarkable to think that such activities were occurring during Job's time. Yet, Job emphasizes that wisdom is more valuable than gold, crystal, and jewels. He acknowledges that true wisdom can only be understood by God and is not something humans can unearth; it must be received from the Divine.   Job's Reflections on the Past: In Chapter 29, Job nostalgically looks back at better days when he felt God's presence, surrounded by loved ones who respected him. He longs for the comfort and security of those moments, even though he currently faces immense suffering. Job's complaints and questions don't lead him to deny God; in fact, Ezekiel recognized him as one of the most righteous men of his time. Job's journey is one of doubt and questioning within the context of faith.   The Progression of Job's Thoughts: Job's evolving thoughts take us on a journey. He initially grapples with God and the existence of wickedness, then delves into the concept of wisdom and understanding. Finally, he reflects on the past and recognizes God's goodness in his life. This progression highlights the complexity of human emotions and the enduring presence of faith amid trials.   The Fear of the Lord: Job 28:28 imparts a profound lesson: "The fear of the Lord is true wisdom; to forsake evil is real understanding." This verse reminds us that wisdom originates from God. It's a valuable insight that can guide us in our daily lives.   The Wisdom that Comes from God: We are encouraged to seek God's wisdom, especially in challenging times. As the writer shares a personal experience, we understand how seeking divine wisdom can transform difficult situations into opportunities for growth, grace, and strengthened relationships.   Comforting Others: In Job's quest for comfort, he eventually realizes that comforting others is a noble pursuit. During life's trials, people don't always need answers; they need the solace of knowing they're not alone. Comforting others allows us to reflect God's love and grace to those in need.   The book of Job offers profound insights into the human condition, the pursuit of wisdom, and the importance of comforting others in times of adversity. Job's journey, marked by doubt and reflection, reminds us that faith can coexist with questions and suffering. Ultimately, Job's story encourages us to seek wisdom from God and extend comfort to those around us, reflecting the love and grace of our Creator. SOCIALS: Tricia: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Michelle: Instagram | LinkedIn Daily Bible Podcast: Instagram | Facebook | Join the Community  LifeAudio: The Daily Bible Podcast is brought to you by LifeAudio - a Christian podcast network dedicated to captivate, inform, and strengthen you
Day 25 - Redeeming Wisdom: Finding Hope Amidst Life's Chaos (Job 22-25) - Year 2
January 25, 2024 - 19 min
All the info you need to START + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Job 22-25 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Pure In our exploration of the biblical narrative of Job, we delve into a world of ancient wisdom, dramatic irony, and profound testing. Today's focus brings us back to Job's conversations with his friends, recorded in poetic form and believed to have been written around Abraham's time. The spotlight falls on Eliphaz the Temanite, a figure emerging from Teman, a city renowned for its wise scholars. This sets the stage for a dialogue that is both intellectually rich and emotionally charged.   Eliphaz, along with Bildad and Zophar, traveled a great distance to comfort Job. Initially, I perceived these friends as less than supportive, given their harsh words to Job. However, a deeper understanding reveals their perspective was molded by the wisdom of their time. They believe Job’s misfortune was God’s punishment. In today's reading, Eliphaz accuses Job of sin and implies that his suffering is self-inflicted. This is dramatic irony. We, as readers, know the heavenly conversation between God and Satan, a knowledge hidden from Job and his friends. They are unaware that Job's suffering is a divine test, not a punishment.   The dramatic irony in Job's tale reminds us that sometimes, our trials are not punishments but tests shaping our faith. Job, feeling the weight of darkness, questions why the wicked are often unpunished. Yet, he acknowledges that despite their apparent security, they are always under God's watchful eye. Bildad's words, questioning how mortals can be innocent before God points to our need for redemption and the foreshadowing of Christ's salvation. In the depths of Job's suffering, we find a glimmer of the Gospel – men’s desire for purity and redemption.   As we think about Eliphaz's accusations, we need to remember the East-West cultural divide in interpreting the Bible. The Eastern setting here was a patron society where the wealthy were expected to care for the needy, earning honor in the process. Eliphaz's accusations, thus, were more than criticisms. They were an attempt to shame Job.   Word of the Day: Pure.    Yet Job knew he was being tested. He says, "I will come out as pure as gold." In my own life, I've experienced this purification process. The challenges and conflicts that arose after adopting children from traumatic backgrounds refined my character. My pride was stripped away, teaching me humility and empathy. As painful as it is, the furnace of trials melts away impurities, revealing a purer, more compassionate self.   These times of testing, though painful, allow us to truly understand God's character. In 2 Corinthians 4:8-10, we see that we may be pressed and perplexed, but not crushed; persecuted, but not abandoned. In our darkest trials, we discover the strength to surrender fully to God, finding peace in His presence alone.   As we continue our journey through the Bible, we'll encounter more instances of this divine purification. The story of Job is not just about suffering and questioning God; it's a narrative that points us towards a greater truth about God's redemptive plan and the purification process we all undergo in our spiritual journey.   What can we take away in our own lives? Our trials are not merely obstacles but divine opportunities to be refined, revealing our true character and drawing us closer to the ultimate source of purity and strength – God Himself. SOCIALS: Tricia: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Michelle: Instagram | LinkedIn Daily Bible Podcast: Instagram | Facebook | Join the Community  LifeAudio: The Daily Bible Podcast is brought to you by LifeAudio - a Christian podcast network dedicated to captivate, inform, and strengthen your faith! Find your new favorite podcast at LifeAudio.com  DISCLAIMER: The Daily Bible Podcast, Tricia Goyer, Michelle Hill, and affiliates are not a church, pastor, spiritual authority, or counseling service. Listeners and viewers consume this content on a voluntary basis and assume all responsibility for
Day 24 - Finding Wisdom and Beauty Amidst Suffering (Job 19-21) - Year 2
January 24, 2024 - 22 min
All the info you need to START + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Job 19-21 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Pause Have you ever experienced an epiphany, that 'aha' moment when everything becomes clear? I had one of those moments this week. Until recently, I had avoided delving into the Book of Job, finding it challenging to connect with a story where a loving God allowed immense suffering to befall Job. It seemed as though God had given Satan free rein, all at Job's expense.   But in the past few days, my perspective has shifted. I realized that God had such confidence in Job's faith that He boasted about him. God knew that amidst the pain, Job would contemplate the deeper aspects of spirituality.   I often process my thoughts through writing, and during my morning work on a new book, I penned this: "With every challenge, there's a lesson and a blessing. On life's imperfect, winding path, each step is an opportunity for growth and a deeper connection with God. It's about uncovering wisdom and beauty woven into the fabric of our everyday lives, even when it feels frayed and worn. Our pain isn't merely a lesson; it's a lifeline. It's a reminder that in our imperfections, amid the chaos, we are not only deeply loved by God but also being shaped by Him."   God's love for Job was so profound that He allowed Job to be tested, demonstrating to others how a faithful man responds to adversity. God understood that, in wrestling with questions, Job would find that trust in God, not necessarily understanding, is the ultimate answer.   We often wonder why the wicked prosper, growing old and powerful while we observe their blessings. This outward perspective can lead to jealousy. We may covet what they have, even if they've lived their lives contrary to God's ways. Consider Job—a righteous man who obeyed God but lost everything. Suffering can be a profoundly isolating experience, like walking through fire that threatens to consume us.   Two verses particularly resonated with me: "My relatives stay far away, and my friends have turned against me. My family is gone, and my close friends have forgotten me." (Job 19:13–14)   Reading these words, my heart aches. Enduring hardship is challenging, but feeling alone amplifies the pain. Initially, people rush to offer support during a crisis, but as time passes, they often become uncertain about how to continue providing assistance. I confess that I've been guilty of this as well. Sympathy and empathy have a limited shelf life. Yet, we should never lose hope. The second verse speaks to us:   "But as for me, I know that my Redeemer lives, and he will stand upon the earth at last. And after my body has decayed, yet in my body, I will see God! I will see him for myself. Yes, I will see him with my own eyes. I am overwhelmed at the thought!" (Job 19:25–27)   Despite feeling forgotten by friends, Job knew he would never be abandoned by God. Even if his earthly life didn't improve, he looked forward to eternity with God. Through his suffering, Job encountered God in profound ways.   Today, when we hear the term "Redeemer," we instantly think of Jesus. Yet, we should remember that Job's story dates back to Abraham's time. The Hebrew word for "Redeemer" is "Goel," denoting the next of kin responsible for redeeming, ransoming, or avenging those in debt, bondage, or family disputes.   Even as Job's friends accused him, he called upon God to avenge his predicament. In Hebrew, it is phrased as "I know my living Redeemer." The inclusion of "my" emphasizes Job's personal relationship with God. God revealed Himself to Job and granted him understanding. In essence, Job declared, "My Redeemer is alive, is now, and I intimately know Him."   Today, we understand that Jesus is the answer to our redemption, allowing us to also claim God as "mine." What's even more remarkable is that God claimed Job as "mine" first, trusting him to remain steadfast. As we nurture our relationship with God, we too can confidently declare, "My Redeemer is alive, is now, and I know Him."   Word of the day: Pause. To halt or rest in action or speech...   Zophar, in Job's story, said, "I must reply because I am greatly disturbed." This resonates with me, especially in challenging discussions with friends facing difficulties. I've realized that I don't need to respond immediately; instead, I should turn to God, pray for wisdom, and provide space for Him to work. During a conversation with Ron Deal, a therapist who leads FamilyLife Blended and has experienced the loss of a young son, he shared valuable insights. He advised being a supportive friend in
Day 23 - A Journey Through Suffering and Faith (Job 15-18) - Year 2
January 23, 2024 - 22 min
All the info you need to START + the printable schedule + links to the Bible we use is on our website: http://dailybiblepodcast.net!   TODAY'S READING: - Job 15-18 WORD OF THE DAY: -  Accuse As we delve into the chapters of Job 15, 16, 17, and 18 today, we find ourselves immersed in a tale of immense suffering, unwavering faith, and the enduring quest for understanding in the midst of life's storms. The book of Job raises profound questions about human suffering and divine justice, leading us to ponder, "Why would a just God allow a righteous man like Job to endure such trials?" The Heavenly Debate and Job's Righteousness Remember, the story of Job isn't merely about human suffering; it's about a celestial debate. The question isn't just why Job suffers, but whether a man can remain righteous in the face of unexplained adversity. God's confidence in Job's righteousness sets the stage for this divine test, despite Satan's assertion that Job's faith is solely dependent on his blessings. Encounters with Friends: Criticism and Misunderstanding In these chapters, Job's friends, Eliphaz and Bildad, offer their perspectives, yet their words bring more pain than solace. Eliphaz's harsh accusations and Bildad's reminders of the wicked's fate only deepen Job's anguish. They see Job's losses as a result of sin, a view we know is untrue from the outset of the story. Job's Response: A Cry of Innocence and Despair Job's reaction is a poignant mix of despair and integrity. He laments his state and longs for a mediator between himself and God, yet he maintains his innocence. His words in Chapter 16 are particularly striking, revealing a sense of abandonment by God, yet earlier he had accepted his fate with praise. This contrast illustrates the complexity of human emotions in the face of suffering. Job and the Shadow of Christ In pondering these chapters, I'm drawn to the symbolic connections to Christ in Isaiah. Job, in his suffering and longing for a mediator, prefigures Christ's role as our ultimate mediator. This connection is a reminder of the Old Testament's role in setting the stage for Christ's coming and His sacrificial act for our sins. The Power of Mediation: A Personal Reflection Reflecting on Job's desire for a mediator, I recall a personal experience. Accused by a friend of copying her work, I felt deeply hurt. Yet, through the mediation of a trained biblical mediator, we found understanding and reconciliation. This experience mirrors our spiritual need for Christ as our mediator. Christ: Our Ultimate Mediator Job's story and my own experiences highlight the importance of mediation. In Christ, we find the perfect mediator who intercedes on our behalf. He bridges the gap between humanity and God, taking upon Himself our sins so that we may stand righteous before God. This is the essence of 2 Corinthians 5:21 and the heart of our Christian faith. Embracing God's Grace As we continue our journey through the book of Job, let us remember the profound lessons it offers. In the face of suffering and misunderstanding, we have a mediator in Christ. Through Him, we are granted access to God's grace and the promise of eternal life, a truth that offers comfort and hope in our darkest hours. Reflecting on today's reading, what insights have you gained about enduring faith in times of suffering? How does understanding Christ as our mediator change your perspective on personal trials? Share your thoughts and let's grow together in faith.   SOCIALS: Tricia: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Michelle: Instagram | LinkedIn Daily Bible Podcast: Instagram | Facebook | Join the Community  LifeAudio: The Daily Bible Podcast is brought to you by LifeAudio - a Christian podcast network dedicated to captivate, inform, and strengthen your faith! Find your new favorite podcast at LifeAudio.com  DISCLAIMER: The Daily Bible Podcast, Tricia Goyer, Michelle Hill, and affiliates are not a church, pastor, spiritual authority, or counseling service. Listeners and viewers consume this content on a voluntary basis and assume all responsibility for the resulting consequences and impact. Discover more Chris
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Meet Your Hosts
Meet Your Hosts
Fueled by a desire to help women walk out God’s Word, Tricia Goyer writes books (over 80), speaks, and podcasts. Tricia writes in numerous genres including fiction, non-fiction, and books for children and teens. She’s a wife and homeschooling mom of ten, and she loves to mentor writers through WriteThatBook.Club. Tricia lives near Little Rock, AR. 
Meet Your Hosts
Radio has been ingrained in Michelle for most of her life. This love for radio has taken her to various radio stations and ministries in places like Chicago, Alaska and other snow-covered terrains like her hometown in north central Iowa, and now Michigan. Michelle serves with Creative Genius Productions as their production manager. She also can be heard on the radio broadcast/podcast License To Parent and FamilyLife This Week®.

Michelle has been mentoring young women for the last 20 years and helped FamilyLife create the product Passport2Identity for young women and their moms, Passport2Identity. She also has a fascination for snowflakes and the color yellow. Michelle makes her home in Buchanan, Michigan….but soon will be moving to Indiana after a wedding!
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